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Dec 1, 2023·edited Dec 2, 2023Pinned

Hello Everyone. This accidentally got sent out on Friday instead of the typical Saturday post. There were a few grammar and spelling errors that have been corrected (I usually do a final read on Friday night.) Thanks for your comments and hope you enjoyed the read!! ~~ Dr. Tenpenny

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Sherri,

You were the first medical doctor I ran across to warn me about the Covid mNRA vax and you were right way before it came out. I am going to believe you on this as well. My HDL is 76 and LDL 118. I am not sure why one is considered good and one bad but I sure as hell am not going to take any prescription drugs. I am 70 and prescription drug free.

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Thank you Dr.T Can I suggest writing about ways to increase one’s cholesterol levels. I have low overall cholesterol , I usually run between 150-190 levels. I’m very healthy and I don’t take any vaccines. But I would like to increase my levels.

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Dec 11, 2023Liked by Dr. Sherri Tenpenny

Very high LDL no impact on plaque progression

https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2023/12/10/very-high-ldl-no-impact-on-plaque-progression/

This is HUGE NEWS! Please share far and wide!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hYLVF7VY3k

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author

this is a better option: ECP Therapy - non invasive, fixes it

https://drtenpenny.substack.com/p/erectile-dysfunction-and-heart-disease

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I highly recommend the few books by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick. I was referred to his work by Substack’s “A Midwestern Doctor.”

Kendrick writes extensively about heart health in general and statins in depth.

If you don't wish to purchase his books, he's written extensively on the same topics on his website:

https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/

Did you know that whatever benefit statins may have, it is almost certainly NOT due to their power to lower cholesterol, especially LDL? How do we know this? Well, we may not “know” it, but numerous other substances to lower lipids were studied over the decades. Many of these did in fact reduce cholesterol or LDL. Problem: in many cases they did not improve the actual symptoms of cardiovascular disease (primarily heart attacks/strokes). They barely altered the all-cause death rate. In some cases, they increased it.

When statins were found to have a net benefit even though it was small, they were seized upon as a wonder drug. This is probably explained primarily because of the huge profit potential that Pharma hoped for and indeed obtained. Successful drugs were a billions of dollars a year moneymaker, at least until patent protections expired. You can be assured they are pushing newer, patentable and thus highly profitable successor treatments for the "problem."

I had my own epiphany in the past two years, about the low value of statin treatment and much else besides. My small Substack has several articles that address these issues, many spring boarding from the work of Kendrick*. I’ve even checked some of his claims, which usually means looking up a cited clinical trial or other scholarly article. Many of these are available for free online. Guess what? I’ve found no errors of fact. Or at least, Kendrick accurately reports what his sources say.

Expanding a bit upon on of Tenpenny’s comments: ALL patients “…should reconsider the risk/benefit of…” well, darned near anything I suspect.

Recently during a routine visit with my cardiologist, I had to explain why I no longer took the baby aspirin, the blood pressure medication, or the statin. Basically I reported that I had educated myself and was convinced that they were very low value interventions, especially for a man with no prior history of heart disease unless you count elevated lipids (which, of course, they see as a threshold for treatment.) The fact that my weigh was 20-30 pounds lower than a year ago, or that my lipids had improved (except LDL), or that my blood pressure was below even the ever-lower official threshold (I think it’s currently 130/80) did not faze my nurse in the least. And her response? It was basically this: “Standard of care requires me to recommend that you go back on the statin.” I don’t fault her, because the medical system is basically bound to promote certain guidelines. Even so, the entire experience was a bit surreal.

Granted not everyone has the time or the inclination to go down these rabbit holes. I’m a pretty smart guy but have no background in medicine. I have a technical background so I’m able to grasp some, certainly not all, of the important details. Following on a few exercises Kendrick does in his book, I was able to gauge – very roughly – what the expected benefit (and cost!) of taking a statin for the rest of my life might offer. On the cost side, I could expect to pay for 20 or more years of drugs, tests and medical office vists, at a ballpark cost of call it $20,000. I would also run the risk of potential adverse effects of the drug. And the expected benefit? That’s probably the hardest to figure out, simply due to what I suspect are unreliable figures in the studies. My life expectancy might be increased by several months, but other authorities claim the benefit might only be a few weeks.

Oh yeah, the point of that prior paragraph is basically to say that the responsibility is upon you, the patient, to educate yourself. It’s sad to say, but my personal experience suggests that your front line doctor or nurse, for all their years of training, is basically doing cookbook medicine. Apparently the pronouncements of a board of “experts” thousands of miles away, most of whom have glaring conflicts of interest, carry more weight when it comes to the treatments you will receive than the latest, or even the not no recent medical discoveries. In other words, while they may not be out to deliberately harm you, and your individual health care provider may not be actually trying to fleece you for fees, it sure seems that the system as a whole puts profit ahead of what’s actually best for the patient. If I’m even halfway correct, then you’ve got to look out for yourself because no one else will.

*In fact, originally I started my Substack so I could post a few articles and link to them, rather than repeatedly pontificate about the issues in random postings like I'm still doing here. As you can see, the effort was well intended but not entirely successful!

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All about liver

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Right!

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Well done. The more people know about this the better. amidwesterndoctor on substack thinks of statins as satans which is very suitable.

https://baldmichael.substack.com/p/statins-are-they-really-good-for

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Thank you for sharing this vital information! It was after reading Dr. David Perlmutter's book, "Grain Brain", several years ago, that I truly became aware of the benefits of cholesterol, most notably LDL! He also touches upon the financial benefits gained by the fear instilled in the general public regarding this "deadly plaque". The deception is deeper than anyone realizes. Few are aware LDL is vital for a number of body functions, one of them being "male virility", and Oh, what a coincidence, the pharmaceutical company who manufactures the #1 Statin drug also manufactures Viagra?!

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God bless you, Dr. Tenpenny, and thank you for sharing!! 🙏

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I had a triple bypass in 2022 and was briefly on Atorvastatin. After my hospital stay I stopped taking it. I told my new cardiologist that our bodies need cholesterol and that I was against taking a statin and had read that inflammation was the cause of many issues, not cholesterol. She told me that Atorvastatin would reduce the inflammation. Okay, I decided to try again and was on 40 mg for a while and while it reduced my ldl, the doctor was not impressed. She doubled my dose and within about a month I hurt so much and felt so weak I could hardly walk. Nope, never again. I'm not buying what she is selling. This is important information . Looking for a new doctor who will be less aggressive! Thank you!

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My grandparents tried to keep me from eating egg yolks due to cholesterol. I think their lack of cholesterol caused their dementia considering how much cholesterol is the brain.

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Thank you for this article. I always felt that my parents (born in the 30's) should not have given up whole milk, butter, cheese, eggs, and all the other nourishing foods they went without to lower cholesterol.

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I figure since the body makes most of its own cholesterol, why mess around with it? I told the cardio doc that statins were off my radar forever. He was not a happy camper. After reading some of Malcolm Kendrick's valuable material about heart disease, I am convinced cholesterol plays a very, very minor rolls in heart trouble, if at all.

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